Why has Google open sourced TensorFlow?

I was sitting in a sun-warmed pizza restaurant in London last week talking about deep learning libraries. Everyone had their favourites. I was betting on TensorFlow, the new kid in town released by Google in late 2015. In response, a Torch fan pointed out that Google may invest in building up TensorFlow internally, but there’s no reason for them to invest in the shared, external version.

This got me thinking – why has Google open sourced TensorFlow?

Naively, I usually assume that companies keep their most crown jewels proprietary while open sourcing the periphery. In other words, keep your secret sauce close to your chest – but share the stuff that’s more generic, since it builds brand and goodwill, others may contribute helpfully, and you’re not straightforwardly giving a leg-up to your direct competitors.

Google’s approach to open source has been a little more strategic than this. Look at a handful of their major open source projects – Android, Chromium, Angular, Go, Dart, V8, Wave, WebM. The motivations behind them are various:

  • Android, Angular, Chromium, V8, Wave, WebM – creating a new version of an existing technology (free, better engineered, or faster) to disrupt an incumbent, or increase usage and thus drive revenue for Google’s core businesses.
  • Go, Dart and the long tail of minor projects are peripheral to their goals and serve less direct strategic interest.

For TensorFlow to make sense and be worthy of long-term support from Google, it needs to fall in the former category.

It is indeed a new version of an existing technology – it’s free, it’s better engineered, though not yet faster.

So, is it intended to either disrupt an incumbent, or to increase usage and thus drive revenue for core Google businesses? I can only think of two possibilities:

  1. TensorFlow is intended to be a major strategic benefit for Android. Machine learning is going to power a wave of new mobile applications, and many of them need to run locally rather than as a client-server app, whether for efficiency, responsiveness or bandwidth reasons. If TensorFlow makes it easier to develop cross-platform, efficient mobile machine learning solutions for Android but not for iOS, that could give the Android app market a major boost.
  2. TensorFlow is intended to be a major strategic benefit for Google’s platform/hosting, and to disrupt AWS. Right now, it’s pretty difficult and expensive to set up a cloud GPU instance. TensorFlow opens up the possibility of a granularly-scalable approach to machine learning that allows us to finally ignore the nitty-gritty of CUDA installations, Python dependencies, and multiple GPUs. Just specify the size of network you want, and TensorFlow allocates and spreads it across hardware as needed. This is why TensorBoard was part of the original implementation, and why AWS support was an afterthought. “Pay by the parameter”. If I had to guess, I’d say this is the major reason for open sourcing TensorFlow.

I want something like the above to be true, because I want there to be a strategic reason for Google to invest in TensorFlow, and I want it to get easier and easier to develop interesting and complex deep learning apps.

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Todo Zero

What if I suggested that you finish each day with nothing left on your todo list? This is the only rule of Todo Zero.

You might find yourself biting back some choice words. This sounds like unhelpful advice from someone with a much simpler life than yours.

Not so fast. Picture a world-class juggler with half-a-dozen balls in motion. How many balls do they have in their hands at once? None, one, or two. Never more than two. The remainder are in the air.

By analogy, work on just one or two things at a time. The remainder can be scheduled for some time in the future. In this way, it’s very possible to finish what’s currently on your list.

Otherwise, all of the competing priorities of a long list clamour for your attention. They clutter one another, making it impossible to focus. When you’re pulled in many directions, you’ll end up immobilized and demotivated.

At least that’s what has happened to me. My implicit solution was to procrastinate until panic seized me, and then enjoy its temporary clarity of focus.

So, here’s a recipe for Todo Zero that will take an hour or two to start with:

  • Go through your todo list and pull out anything that’s going to take less than 10 minutes.
  • Pick out the one or two jobs that you really want to tackle – these should be the most important or urgent things on your list. Break them down into pieces that you could tackle today if you really put your mind to it, and note them down.
  • Schedule everything else as future events in your calendar (I usually just assign them to a date without a time). Give yourself enough room before the deadline to finish them without rushing. Don’t be over-optimistic about how many or how quickly you can work through them.

So, that leaves you with quick tasks that take less than 10 minutes, along with the one or two most urgent/important jobs for today.

Marvel at your wonderfully shortened todo list. Look away, take a deep breath. Do not look at your email. Make a coffee. Feel a little calmer than you did, and enjoy it.

Now, let’s do the same for your email.

  • Find any emails that are going to take less than 10 minutes to reply to, and boomerang them for 2 hours’ time.
  • Pull out one or two emails that are urgent or important, and boomerang them for 1 hour’s time.
  • If you have the energy, boomerang each of your remaining emails for future times individually (tomorrow, a week away or a month away, depending on urgency). If you don’t have the energy, just boomerang them wholesale for tomorrow morning.

Stand up, and take a deep breath. Walk around for a few minutes, and make a cup of coffee. This is going really well.

  • By the time you get back, you should be staring at a short todo list and a pretty clear inbox. [If anything new has landed, or any have boomeranged back, send them away for an hour. We need a clear head]
  • Now, let’s dispatch the less-than-ten-minute odds & ends tasks. Do some of them, most of them, all of them, it doesn’t matter. Just a few, to get back a sense of momentum.
  • Your most urgent emails have boomeranged back. Deal with them.

Take a break.

At this point, you’re close to the point where you have a clean slate, and just your important tasks. You probably have some meetings and stuff. Have lunch. Refresh.

  • Now, it’s time to tackle those one or two important high-priority tasks-for-today.
  • Picture yourself at the end of the day, leaning back in your chair with your hands knitted behind your head, smugly. For that to happen, double down on those one or two most important things, and the rest can wait. You will feel great.
  • Don’t do anything else today. Don’t check your email if you can avoid it. Your goal is to boomerang away (by email or calendar) anything but them.

With any luck, you made progress on those one or two most important tasks.

Armed with this approach, you can triage your own life. You can choose to focus on the most urgent or important things first, and ignore the rest. They’ll shamble back when their time has come, and then you can dispatch them in turn.

P.S. There are a few tools that will help:

  • Google Calendar – add a new ‘Todo’ calendar, whose notifications are set by default to email you at the time of the event.
  • Any simple todo list app or text editor of your choosing. It doesn’t matter.

P.P.S. One final note. I can’t juggle two balls, let alone six. So take that into account, seasoned with a pinch of salt, in reading this.

P.P.P.S. Of course, there is nothing that’s original here. It’s a death-metal-mashup of Inbox Zero and GTD. It’s not always feasible to work like this. If you don’t procrastinate, you probably don’t need it. Etc.

Sanity checks as data sidekicks

Abe Gong asked for good examples of ‘data sidekicks‘.

I still haven’t got the hang of distilling complex thoughts into 140 characters, and so I was worried my reply might have been compressed into cryptic nonsense.

Here’s what I was trying to say:

Let’s say you’re trying to do a difficult classification on a dataset that has had a lot of preprocessing/transformation, like fMRI brain data. There are a million reasons why things could be going wrong.

(sorry, Tolstoy)

Things could be failing for meaningful reasons, e.g.:

  • the brain doesn’t work the way you think, so you’re analysing the wrong brain regions or representing things in a different way
  • there’s signal there but it’s represented at a finer-grained resolution than you can measure.

But the most likely explanation is that you screwed up your preprocessing (mis-imported the data, mis-aligned the labels, mixed up the X-Y-Z dimensions etc).

If you can’t classify someone staring at a blank screen vs a screen with something on it, it’s probably something like this, since visual input is pretty much the strongest and most wide-spread signal in the brain – your whole posterior cortex lights up in response to high-salience images (like faces and places).

In the time I spent writing this, Abe had already figured out what I meant 🙂

Two-level tagging

Have you ever had trouble deciding where to store a file on your hard disk? Or worse, had trouble finding it later?

When you store a file on your hard disk, you have to decide which folder to put it in. That folder can in turn live inside other folders. This results in a hierarchy, known in computer science as a *tree*.

The main problem with trees is that sometimes you want things to live in multiple places.

Tagging provides an alternate system. Tags are a lot like folders, except that things can belong to multiple tags. However, but the tags can’t themselves belong to anything. So you have just one level of organisation with no nesting.

The main problem with single-level tagging is that it’s too simple. We want to be able to use fine-grained categories (e.g. ‘lesser spotted greeb’) that themselves belong to higher-level categories (e.g. ‘greeb’, or even ‘bird’ or ‘animal’). But we said that tags can’t themselves belong to tags.

Described like this, perhaps the solution will seem obvious to you too. We want things to belong to multiple tags, and for those tags to sometimes belong to other tags.

I built this into Emacs Freex, my note-taking system.

For instance, I have tagged this blog post with ‘data structure’ and ‘blogme’. In turn ‘data structure’ is tagged with ‘computer science’ and ‘blogme’ is tagged with ‘writing’. So I can find this blog post later in various ways, including by intersecting ‘computer science’ and ‘writing’.

This gives you the best of both worlds: things belong to multiple categories, along with a hierarchy of categories.

Blogging with WordPress and Emacs

When it comes to tools, I am a hedgehog rather than a fox. I like to have a small number of tools, and to know them well.

I recently resolved to start writing again. But I decided that I needed to sharpen my pencils first.

I have plans on how publishing and sharing should work. Grand plans. Too grand, perhaps.

So for now, I wrote something simple for myself. Now I can type away, press buttons… publish.

If you like Emacs, Python and WordPress, this might be interesting to you too. If not, it certainly won’t be.

wordpress-python-emacs GitHub repository

Most of the work is being done by this great Python/Wordpress library. Thank you.

I wrote some simple Python scripts. One grabs all my existing blog posts. One looks through their titles, and checks them against the filename to see if this is a new post.

And then there’s a very simple Emacs function that calls them to save/publish the current text file.

I could add more things: deleting posts, or a proper workflow for moving from draft to published. Maybe later.

I wrote this post, then hit M-x wordpress-publish-this-file.

Breaking the seal

I’ve wanted to try daily writing for an impossibly long time, but the first words didn’t want to be dragged out.

In my case, they were unstoppered by a day in London. I pinballed from train platforms to coffee shops, oblivious bustle all around me, far away from the furrowed-browed finger-pecking at Memrise HQ. That context-shift provided a firebreak from the quotidian, and I was finally in the mood to mentally roll up my sleeves and rub my hands together.

Writing’s like peeing – once you break the seal, the words just spill forth all evening.

I was able to decant a dozen half-thoughts that I queued up like toy soldiers, to be birthed one by one over the following week. It’s now rather fun to receive a blog post from my previous self every day.